ALCOHOL LAW ADVISOR
ALCOHOL LAW ADVISOR
Regulatory and Distribution Law Updates for the Alcohol Industry
ALCOHOL LAW ADVISOR
Regulatory and Distribution Law Updates for the Alcohol Industry
coronavirus
Subscribe to coronavirus's Posts

TTB and FDA Relax Restrictions on the Production of Hand Sanitizers by Alcohol Manufacturers

With the increasing pace of the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and the related emergent need to increase the available supply for hand sanitizer products across the United States, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), followed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA), have relaxed requirements for certain alcohol producers to produce these products without first amending their existing permits or obtaining prior formula approval. On March 18, 2020, TTB came forward advising industry members that it has found it necessary and desirable to waive provisions of the internal revenue law to provide certain exemptions and authorizations for distilled spirits permittees to produce ethanol-based hand sanitizers to address the demand for such products during this time of national emergency. More specifically, TTB’s guidance provides: The exemptions are in effect through June 30, 2020. Alcohol fuel plants (AFPs) and beverage distilled spirits plants...

Continue Reading

TTB Relaxes Consignment Sale Restrictions in Wake of Coronavirus Cancellations

On Friday, March 13, 2019, in the wake of growing concerns and related mass cancellations of large events all across the United States, the federal Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) announced that it is relaxing federal restrictions on alcoholic beverage returns that might otherwise violate prohibitions associated with consignment sales. As a refresher, the Federal Alcohol Administration (FAA) Act 27 C.F.R., Part 11, Subpart D, and more specifically 27 C.F.R. § 11.31, provides that “it is unlawful to sell, offer to sell, or contract to sell products with the privilege of return for any reason, other than those considered to be ‘ordinary and usual commercial reasons’ arising after the product has been sold.” Sections 11.32 through 11.39 provide those circumstances that are considered “ordinary and usual commercial reasons” under the FAA, including: Defective products Discrepancies between the products ordered and delivered Products that may no...

Continue Reading

STAY CONNECTED

TOPICS

ARCHIVES